Category Archives: World News

Aung San Suu Kyi’s Comments on Muslims Expose Endemic Anti-Muslim Prejudice

Posted: 01/11/2013 17:38

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s interview with the BBC during her visit to the UK, has shocked many of her admirers. Despite being repeatedly pressed to do so, she repeatedly avoided giving a clear unequivocal condemnation of the anti-Muslim violence that is engulfing Burma.

As a Muslim Rohingya and an advocate for human rights who spent many years campaigning for her freedom, it is hard to express the shock I felt at her words during this interview.

She started by dismissing reports of ethnic cleansing against the Rohingya Muslim minority. On what basis does she make this denial? Despite repeated requests, in the 16 months since the violence against Muslims began in Rakhine State, she has not once visited the area. In contrast, Human Rights Watch has been to the areas where attacks took place, gathered evidence, and had experts in international law examine it. Their conclusion is that there is evidence of ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. Presented with such evidence, how can anyone who cares about human rights just dismiss this out of hand as she did?

Given the opportunity to clearly condemn attacks against Muslims, she repeatedly refused to do so. Instead she generalised by saying she condemned all violence and hatred. She has moral authority like no other person in Burma. When she speaks, people listen. If she strongly condemned attacks on Muslims it would make a difference. It could calm the situation. But she didn’t. Instead, she went beyond just trying to explain why the violence was taking place, and sounded like she was making excuses for it. First she did this by saying it was because Buddhists were also living in fear. How can this be true? Buddhists are by far the biggest majority in Burma. Secondly she talked about Buddhists also being subjected to violence and having to flee Burma. The overwhelming majority of violence has been Buddhists attacking Muslims, not the other way around. No Buddhists have fled Burma because of attacks by Muslims. They fled because of repression by the Buddhist led dictatorship. Even if there was real fear as she claims, that doesn’t justify people taking to the streets and burning alive their Muslim neighbours.

In the past 16 months alone, 140,000 Rohingya Muslims have been forced to flee to squalid temporary camps. This compares to less than five thousand Rakhine Buddhists who fled homes after tit-for-tat attacks when violence against Rohingya began in June last year. Why is Aung San Suu Kyi trying to portray this as two sides suffering equally, when the facts prove this is not the case?

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi also started talking about global Muslim power, as if this is some kind of threat to Burma? To hear a Nobel Peace Prize winner talking in the same way about Islam as bigots and racists is very disappointing. There are conspiracy theories about a global Muslim conspiracy to take over Burma, but these kind of things are spread by crazy people on Facebook. It is not what you expect from a University educated leader of a democracy movement. Instead of dismissing these claims as the dangerous nonsense they are, she gave them credibility in the eyes of many Burmese.

When Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was asked about the Monk Wirathu, who incites hatred and violence against Muslims, she also avoided criticising him, again just using generalisations saying she condemns hate of any kind. This hasn’t gone unnoticed in Burma.

Perhaps one of her most revealing comments was when she talking about Muslims integrating. She was not only talking about the Rohingya. She was talking about Muslims generally. How and why do people who are native to Burma, having lived there countless centuries, need to integrate? They are Burmese, and unlike most Rohingya Muslims, they have Burmese citizenship. Most have never even travelled abroad, and nor have any of their ancestors. But Aung San Suu Kyi doesn’t seem to see them that way. She sees them as different and needing to integrate. Seeing as the only difference is their religion, does she share the common view among many Buddhists in Burma that Muslims are not real Burmese?

In the west admirers might be shocked and disappointed by Aung San Suu Kyi’s comments, but in Burma the consequences are much more serious. Those who are inciting anti-Muslim hatred have taken great encouragement from her words, and we expect more violence against us. The United Nations has an opportunity to help by including the establishment of a commission of inquiry into this violence in the General Assembly resolution on Burma which they are currently drafting. This could establish the truth and make recommendations for action. We already knew the government won’t stop the violence, and it is now clear the democratic opposition won’t do anything either. If the UN also abandons us, we will be left without hope.

Follow Tun Khin on Twitter: www.twitter.com/tunkhin80

Burma calls on USA to provide ‘solid reason’ for surveillance

Obama

Burmese presidential spokesperson Ye Htut has said that Burma expects the USA to provide a “solid reason” as to why it used its embassy in Rangoon as a surveillance outpost to hack phone calls and electronic communications for Washington.

According to a recent leak by US intelligence whistleblower Edward Snowden, the US has 90 surveillance facilities set up around the world including its embassy in Burma.

“We only know from what we read in the international media, however we would like to second the remarks made by the EU and other US allies such as Brazil and Mexico that the US needs to provide a solid reason to have hacked into emails and telephone conversations by leaders and citizens of their countries otherwise it will signify a lack of diplomatic ethics,” said Ye Htut.

Speaking to DVB, he added: “If you want to peep into someone’s house, you need a solid reason for doing so.”

He also said it was “no surprise” to learn that the US was spying on other countries.

“It is not surprising to find out that the US has been spying on us given that they have the technology to do so. However they need to consider whether it is an appropriate thing to do or not,” he said.

Responding to DVB, a US embassy spokesperson in Rangoon, Sarah Hutchison, said, “We know these matters have created significant challenges in our relationships with some of our closest foreign partners. As the [US] President has said, the United States is reviewing the way that we gather intelligence to ensure that we are properly balancing the security concerns of our citizens and international partners with the privacy concerns that all people share. We want to ensure we are collecting information because we need it and not just because we can. We are going to continue to address these issues with our partners in diplomatic channels.”

Confiscations, Destructions and Muslims Locations in Arakan Up to Year 2010

By Habib,

1. Sittwe/Akyab: Confiscations, Destructions and Muslims Locations Up to Year 2010

Akyab is one of the 3rd largest Muslim population after Maungdaw and Buthidaung. It reached to two third prior to and during British emperor and Rohingya dialect became a main language for social and commercial dealings. Presently, there are 72 muslim villages consisting Rohingya, Kaman and Rakhine muslims and the rest about 50 Rakhine villages.

Apart from destructions and causalities in 1784, 1942, 1949 and 1978, list of confiscations & demolishings after  1978 are as follows;
1) Rohingyas who resided in the town, near by market areas and along Mawlake and Ambalar main roads were moved to farer places for various concerns including requirements such as zinc roofing, fence, taxes and other huge legal responsibilities.

2) The old Thatkaybyin (Sakki Fara) village demolished in 1990 when Win Myint promoted as a Rakhine state command-commander who later became the third secretary of Burma and died in an accident in Mawlamyine. The village was replaced by Military Missile Force, (818)-Military Camp, Military Communication Camp-(4) and Training Field.

3) The old Santole village was demolished in 1990 and relocated at the back side of Sittwe Lake (Kandawgyi). And fishery factories and stored ports  was replaced there and named as industrial park.

4) Some houses of Holtaung (Buhar fara), along the both sides of the Mayu road, were seized in the late 1990 and built there Buddhist Museum completed in 1997 and  Lawkananda Pagoda completed in 1999.

5) Half of the both West and East Sanpya (Baasara Fara) were relocated in new Thatkaybyin in 1990 including some farming lands seized for the Golf Mart expenditure.

6) Rohingya farming lands of Daapaine (Thae Chaung) were used to expend local Rakines village of  Shwe Min Gan in later of 1990.

7) The half land of the biggest central Mosque was seized and built the Cultural Museum completed in 1997.

8) The areas today called Ye new Su (Derum fara), located police residential area, was Rohingya farming lands confiscated in 1978, and utilized later of 1990.

9) The area of New College completed in 2000 was the lands of Bumay (Furang fara) village. And the new GTC college area was belong to the Fyalikchaung villagers. Most of the farming lands between Fyalikchaung Fara and Shabok Fara were seized for further.

10) In 2001 Feb 5, Four houses had been burnt down  in the riot between Rohingya and Rakhine in Aungmingala (Mole fara). The next day on 6 Feb 2001, about 22 houses along Nazi road side of Konden ward, were fired into ashes. Military had introduced Martial-law for both area before the riot but it did not stop aggression behaviors. And arrested about hundred of Rohingya youths including acting leaders. Those burnt down areas were seized and villagers were relocated in Santole and  New Thatkaybyin.

11)All of environmental creeks were seized since 1990 and used for military income and tender back to Rohingya in every year.

12) The area today built up there City Hall was seized during Nagamin Operation but the building was completed in 1998.

13) A shrine mosque Buddar Mukan (Bodumuhun), which was built in 1756 for the memory of Saint (Fakir) according to The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland © 1894 Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland.  ( http://www.jstor.org/pss/25197219 )
It is situated near by East Sanpya (East Basara Fara). The two rocks lap each other found in front of the shrine and two caves used for meditation by Saint. They were seized since 1978 but not demolished yet. But,  the farming lands near by there were Rohingyas and located Navy camp before 1990. Now, replaced military training school and the building is  locked in the compound. Muslims were  allowed to worship until 1990.

14) Another shrine Baziaraa mosque, tomb and pound are situated the southern part of Sittwe Lake (Kandawgyi) and muslim village near by it was Sanggana fara. According to Rohingya villager, this mosque was also built in a bit later time of Bandar Mokan. Despite the village and this mosque were seized in about 1985, muslims were allowed to pray until 1990. later it was locked and used as Military Camp. Authority also do not dare to destroy this mosque as it was built after that area appeared as a sign of the edge of Sittwe.

                                                        ……………………………….
2. Kyauktaw: Confiscations, Destructions and Muslims Locations Up to Year 2010


The population of muslim before 1942 in Kyauktaw was about 70% of total population of Kyauktaw but now dropped at less than 25%.

Distruction and Confiscation;
1) Manaegya fara (market area) in the main of the town,  muslim houses were reduced slowly by replacing Rakhines, monasteries, and expansion of market lots. The progress started since 1967. Now, no Muslim allow to hold shop unit in the market area, but some shops exist at the outside of the market area, even though the earlier business establishers were originally
muslim. Now, no more Rohingya remained in this main village.

2)Rungsu fara in Dok-kan-chaung Rakhine village and Borgua fara in Boseingya village with mixed of a few Hindhu residents, were replaced by Rakhines in 1967. And many farming lands in Dokkanchaung, Ambare, Boseingya were confiscated but retained later only half of the Ambare lands in about 1969-70 after one of the villager met with president general Saw Maung.

3) Sangadaung  village was demolished in 1976 and built there the Sugar Mill in 1982. The villagers were relocated in Falom fara. Again in 1995, both new settlers of Sangadaung and the villagers of Falom fara were forcefully moved to 7 miles farer area. But, all villagers came back and settled near by the edge of the old Falom-fara.

4) Kanpaw fara in Rakhine Paik-tay-yet was destructed to pave space for new bridge project but Rakhines are still allowed to stay. The villagers were relocated near by Futakhale fara where is a creek call Kanta Chaung.

5) Between 1992 and 2006, many irrigation farming lands both in table areas in; Falom fara, Khondol Barwa fara (Khaungdok Alay Kyuan), Bazar fara, Nai-raung fara (Radanapon) and beach side areas in Aapawa (Aa-fok), Foeyda fara, Haine fara, Guu-taung bazzar, Ambare fara, Boseingya fara, were confiscated for Sugar plant  plantations. The owner of animals got fine for their animals entering into these plantations and many animals were seized as well.

……………………………………………….

3. Mrauk Oo @ Mrohaung: Confiscations, Destructions and Muslims Locations Up to Year 2010

Mrauk Oo (formerly known as Mrohaung). There is another a small town call Minbya township situated opposite side of Mrauk Oo, was also counted Mrauk Oo territory. But at the present the sate Rakhine/Arakan is expended up to 20 towns from 17 towns. So, Minbya is considered as separate town.

22 Muslim Villages of Mrauk Oo Territory:
In Mrauk Oo: Pound Dok @ Fun-du-kul, Pa-rein @ Bolti Fara, Fee-fa-runk, Desh Fara @ Tha-rak-cho, Zula Fra and opposite Ze-zah- Fara, San-daung, Kum fara, Shi-sha-reit, Fu-tha-lon, Fu-Le-yaung,
In Minbya: Fike Mraung @ Pann mraung- mix of Hindunisms and Rakhines, Faw-sa Fra, Lom-bow-shaw, Taw-daine @ Aung Daine, Fok Fara, Saam-ma-lee, Zai-la fara (fishery village), Khim fara, Halim Fara, Sai-Tha Fara and some sparsely in Minbya town.

Existing Ancient Mosque

Alam Lashkar Mosque built by Mrauk Oo King’s army officer during Mrauk Oo dynasty, in Pann Mraung (Fike Mraung)  village of Minbya. It is still only one existing ancient mosque.

   ( yet to be located)

Destruction and Confiscation of other Ancient Mosques;
3) In 1993, Aung Daine village and Nyung Pin Zay village near by jetty, only Rohingya houses from Shit Taung including Shwedah Qazi Mosque, were demolished and relocated at Kwan Lon (Kha-wa-lon @ Mandarabyin) village. And the places were replaced with  Electric Station and house lots for military
4) In the middle of 1994, Aa-Lae-Zay @ Shwe Gu Daung village including Nan Oo Mosque, Kwan Lon (Kha-wa-lon @ Mandarabyin) plus Sandhi Khan Mosque, Ponna Mraung village, were demolished by Military forces-540.
The villagers about 10,000 Rohingyas were forcefully lifted to Maungdaw town. Some Kwan Lon villagers who escaped had tried to resettle in own village by rebuilding temporary tents, were also lifted to Maungdaw town.
The villagers’ lands were replaced with Military Forces-540, Military Forces-377 and Environmental Projects.
5) Maung Tha Gon (Rwa Handaa Fara) village including Musa Pali Mosque were demolished in about 1983. The villagers were relocated to Kan Paw village and their lands were replaced with model village of Rakhines and military purposes.
6) Farming lands of Paung Do (Fun-du-Kol) villagers were seized and replaced with Military Forces-378 but the village was not demolished up to year 2010.
More details::
3) Shwe Dah Qazi Mosque (Gold Sword Qazi mosque), built by Qazi Abdul Karim who awarded gold sword by Burman king Bodaw Pya,  situated in Shit Taung (Kyit Taung, mean 80,000) village. It was demolished in 1993. …..
4) stone structure Sandhikhan mosque built in 1433 by Muslim army Sandhikhan of Bengal who came to help enthrone king Narameikhla(The founder of Mrauk-U dynasty), in Kwan Lon (Kha-wa-lon @ Mandarabyin) village of Mrauk Oo, was demolished in 1994. The stone blocks and teaks beside the mosque were forcefully carried by Rohingya carts and used in expansion of  Buddhist monastery of Shwe Taung village.
4) Nan Oo Mosque and Nantha Tank with stone embankment, in Aa-Lae-Zay(Shwe Gu Taung) village, near by hospital and palace office, was demolished in 1994 but Nantha pound(tank) still exists.
5) stone structure Majah Pali @ Musa Pali Mosque with its big pond in the eastern, were built in 1513-15 in Kan Paw village, by an Indian missionary Musa in the time of 9th king of Mrauk U 1513-1515 A.D. It stands Maung Tha Gon Village, Mrauk-U and demolished in about 1983.
……………………………..

 

Posted by NDPHR at 6/06/2011 08:36:00 pm

Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu , ” accompanied by six foreign ministers of the visit to Burma within the next two weeks

أمين "التعاون الإسلامي" وستة وزراء يزورون بورما في غضون أسبوعين
Rohingya news agency : The Secretary General of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation , ” Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu , ” accompanied by six foreign ministers of the visit to Burma within the next two weeks , so as to continue with the government of Burma to stand on acts of violence against Muslims there.

Said Professor ” Ihsanoglu ” after the special session to be held in the United Nations Security Council : he will visit Burma to focus on the rights of ethnic Rohingya Muslims and the issue of citizenship in their own country .

In the meantime ; said the Permanent Observer to the United Nations of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation ” approved Gokcen :” Apart from the project drafted by the European Union , a project of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation to put an end to the violence in Burma ; it should be up to the Security Council of the United Nations by 1
– See more at: http://www.rna-press.com/ar/news/24306.html # sthash.4qJn0fCd.pg0TuPb6.dpuf

Special Report – In Myanmar, apartheid tactics against minority Muslims

Wed, May 15 06:22 AM EDT
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By Jason Szep

SITTWE, Myanmar (Reuters) – A 16-year-old Muslim boy lay dying on a thin metal table. Bitten by a rabid dog a month ago, he convulsed and drooled as his parents wedged a stick between his teeth to stop him from biting off his tongue.

Swift treatment might have saved Waadulae. But there are no doctors, painkillers or vaccines in this primitive hospital near Sittwe, capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar. It is a lonely medical outpost that serves about 85,300 displaced people, almost all of them Muslims who lost their homes in fighting with Buddhist mobs last year.

“All we can give him is sedatives,” said Maung Maung Hla, a former health ministry official who, despite lacking a medical degree, treats about 150 patients a day. The two doctors who once worked there haven’t been seen in a month. Medical supplies stopped when they left, said Maung Maung Hla, a Muslim.

These trash-strewn camps represent the dark side of Myanmar’s celebrated transition to democracy: apartheid-like policies segregating minority Muslims from the Buddhist majority. As communal violence spreads, nowhere are these practices more brutally enforced than around Sittwe.

In an echo of what happened in the Balkans after the fall of communist Yugoslavia, the loosening of authoritarian control in Myanmar is giving freer rein to ethnic hatred.

President Thein Sein, a former general, said in a May 6 televised speech his government was committed to creating “a peaceful and harmonious society in Rakhine State.”

But the sand dunes and barren paddy fields outside Sittwe hold a different story. Here, emergency shelters set up for Rohingya Muslims last year have become permanent, prison-like ghettos. Muslims are stopped from leaving at gunpoint. Aid workers are threatened. Camps seethe with anger and disease.

In central Sittwe, ethnic Rakhine Buddhists and local officials exult in what they regard as a hard-won triumph: streets almost devoid of Muslims. Before last year’s violence, the city’s Muslims numbered about 73,000, nearly half its population. Today, there are fewer than 5,000 left.

Myanmar’s transformation from global pariah to budding democracy once seemed remarkably smooth. After nearly half a century of military dictatorship, the quasi-civilian government that took power in March 2011 astonished the world by releasing dissidents, relaxing censorship and re-engaging with the West.

Then came the worst sectarian violence for decades. Clashes between Rakhine Buddhists and stateless Rohingya Muslims in June and October 2012 killed at least 192 people and displaced 140,000. Most of the dead and homeless were Muslims.

“Rakhine State is going through a profound crisis” that “has the potential to undermine the entire reform process,” said Tomás Ojea Quintana, U.N. special rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar.

Life here, he said, resembles junta-era Myanmar, with rampant human-rights abuses and a pervasive security apparatus. “What is happening in Rakhine State is following the pattern of what has happened in Myanmar during the military government,” he said in an interview.

The crisis poses the biggest domestic challenge yet for the reformist leaders of one of Asia’s most ethnically diverse countries. Muslims make up about 5 percent of its 60 million people. Minorities, such as the Kachin and the Shan, are watching closely after enduring persecution under the former junta.

As the first powerful storm of the monsoon season approached western Myanmar this week, the government and U.N. agencies began a chaotic evacuation from the camps, urging thousands of Rohingya Muslims to move to safer areas on higher ground across Rakhine State.

Some resisted, fearing they would lose all they had left: their tarpaulin tents and makeshift huts. More than 50 are believed to have drowned in a botched evacuation by sea.

“THEY ALL TELL LIES”

Sittwe’s last remaining Muslim-dominated quarter, Aung Mingalar, is locked down by police and soldiers who patrol all streets leading in and out. Muslims can’t leave without written permission from Buddhist local authorities, which Muslims say is almost impossible to secure.

Metal barricades, topped with razor wire, are opened only for Buddhist Rakhines. Despite a ban against foreign journalists, Reuters was able to enter Aung Mingalar. Near-deserted streets were flanked by shuttered shops. Some Muslims peered from doors or windows.

On the other side of the barricades, Rakhine Buddhists revel in the segregation.

“I don’t trust them. They are not honest,” said Khin Mya, 63, who owns a general store on Sittwe’s main street. “Muslims are hot-headed; they like to fight, either with us or among themselves.”

Ei Mon Kyaw, 19, who sells betel nut and chewing tobacco, said Muslims are “really dirty. It is better we live apart.”

State spokesman Win Myaing, a Buddhist, explained why Aung Mingalar’s besieged Muslims were forbidden from speaking to the media. “It’s because they all tell lies,” he said. He also denied the government had engaged in ethnic cleansing, a charge leveled most recently by Human Rights Watch in an April 22 report.

“How can it be ethnic cleansing? They are not an ethnic group,” he said from an office on Sittwe’s main street, overlooking an empty mosque guarded by soldiers and police.

His comments reflect a historic dispute over the origins of the country’s estimated 800,000 Rohingya Muslims, who claim a centuries-old lineage in Rakhine State.

The government says they are Muslim migrants from northern neighbor Bangladesh who arrived during British rule from 1824. After independence in 1948, Myanmar’s new rulers tried to limit citizenship to those whose roots in the country predated British rule. A 1982 Citizenship Act excluded Rohingya from the country’s 135 recognized ethnic groups, denying them citizenship and rendering them stateless. Bangladesh also disowns them and has refused to grant them refugee status since 1992.

The United Nations calls them “virtually friendless” and among the world’s most persecuted people.

BOAT PEOPLE EXODUS

The state government has shelved any plan to return the Rohingya Muslims to their villages on a technicality: for defying a state requirement that they identify themselves as “Bengali,” a term that suggests they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

All these factors are accelerating an exodus of Rohingya boat people emigrating in rickety fishing vessels to other Southeast Asian countries.

From October to March, between the monsoons, about 25,000 Rohingya left Myanmar on boats, according to new data from Arakan Project, a Rohingya advocacy group. That was double the previous year, turning a Rakhine problem into a region-wide one.

The cost of the one-way ticket is steep for an impoverished people – usually about 200,000 kyat, or $220, often paid for by remittances from family members who have already left.

Many who survive the perilous journeys wind up in majority-Muslim Malaysia. Some end up in U.N. camps, where they are denied permanent asylum. Others find illegal work on construction sites or other subsistence jobs. Tens of thousands are held in camps in Thailand. Growing numbers have been detained in Indonesia.

MOB VIOLENCE

Rakhine State, one of the poorest regions of Southeast Asia’s poorest country, had high hopes for the reform era.

In Sittwe’s harbor, India is funding a $214 million port, river and road network that will carve a trade route into India’s landlocked northeast. From Kyaukphyu, a city 65 miles southeast of Sittwe, gas and oil pipelines stretch to China’s energy-hungry northwest. Both projects capitalize on Myanmar’s growing importance at Asia’s crossroads.

That promise has been interrupted by communal tensions that flared into the open after the rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by Muslim men in May last year. Six days later, in retribution, a Buddhist mob beat 10 Muslims to death. Violence then swept Maungdaw, one of the three Rohingya-majority districts bordering Bangladesh, on June 8. Rohingya mobs destroyed homes and killed an unknown number of Rakhines.

The clashes spread to Sittwe. More than 2,500 homes and buildings went up in flames, as Rohingya and Rakhine mobs rampaged. When the smoke cleared, both suffered losses, though the official death toll for Rohingya – 57 – was nearly double that for Buddhist Rakhines. Entire Muslim districts were razed.

October saw more violence. This time, Buddhist mobs attacked Muslim villages across the state over five days, led in some cases by Rakhine nationalists tied to a powerful political party, incited by Buddhist monks and abetted at times by local security forces..

U.S. President Barack Obama, on a groundbreaking visit in November, urged reconciliation. “The Rohingya … hold within themselves the same dignity as you do, and I do,” he said. The week he visited, Thein Sein vowed to forge ethnic unity in a letter to the United Nations.

But the violence kept spreading. Anti-Muslim unrest, whipped up by Buddhist monks, killed at least 44 people in the central city of Meikhtila in March. In April and May, Buddhist mobs destroyed mosques and hundreds of Muslim homes just a few hours’ drive from Yangon, the country’s largest city.

Thein Sein responded by sending troops to volatile areas and setting up an independent commission into the Rakhine violence. Its recommendations, released April 27, urged meetings of Muslim and Buddhist leaders to foster tolerance, Muslims to be moved to safer ground ahead of the storm season, and the continued segregation of the two communities “until the overt emotions subside.”

It sent a strong message, calling the Rohingya “Bengalis,” a term that suggests they belong in Bangladesh, and backing the 1982 citizenship law that rendered stateless even those Rohingya who had lived in Myanmar for generations.

The Rohingya’s rapid population growth had fueled the clashes with Buddhists, it said, recommending voluntary family-planning education programs for them. It suggested doubling the number of soldiers and police in the region.

Rohingya responded angrily. “We completely reject this report,” said Fukan Ahmed, 54, a Rohingya elder who lost his home in Sittwe.

Local government officials, however, were already moving to impose policies in line with the report.

THE HATED LIST

On the morning of April 26, a group of state officials entered the Theak Kae Pyin refugee camp. With them were three policemen and several Border Administration Force officers, known as the Nasaka, a word derived from the initials of its Burmese name. Unique to the region, the Nasaka consists of officers from the police, military, customs and immigration. They control every aspect of Rohingya life, and are much feared.

Documented human-rights abuses blamed on the Nasaka include rape, forced labor and extortion. Rohingya cannot travel or marry without the Nasaka’s permission, which is never secured without paying bribes, activists allege.

State spokesman Win Myaing said the Nasaka’s mission was to compile a list identifying where people had lived before the violence, a precondition for resettlement. They wanted to know who was from Sittwe and who was from more remote townships such as Pauktaw and Kyaukphyu, areas that saw a near-total expulsion of Muslims in October.

Many fled for what Win Myaing said were unregistered camps outside Sittwe, often in flood-prone areas. “We would like to move them back to where they came from in the next two months,” said Win Myaing. The list was the first step towards doing that.

The list, however, also required Muslims to identify themselves as Bengali. For Fukan Ahmed and other Rohingya leaders, it sent a chilling message: If they want to be resettled, they must deny their identity.

Agitated crowds gathered as the officials tried to compile the list, witnesses said. Women and children chanted “Rohingya! Rohingya!” As the police officers were leaving, one tumbled to the ground, struck by a stone to his head, according to Win Myaing. Rohingya witnesses said the officer tripped. Seven Rohingya were arrested and charged with causing grievous hurt to a public servant, criminal intimidation and rioting.

Compiling the list is on hold, said Win Myaing. So, too, is resettlement.

“If they trust us, then (resettlement) can happen immediately. If you won’t even accept us making a list, then how can we try and do other things?” he asked. The crisis could be defused if Rohingya accepted the 1982 Citizenship Law, he said.

But doing so would effectively confirm their statelessness. Official discrimination and lack of documentation meant many Rohingya have no hope of fulfilling the requirements.

Boshi Raman, 40, said he and other Rohingya would never sign a document calling themselves Bengali. “We would rather die,” he said.

Win Myaing blamed the Rohingya for their misfortune. “If you look back at the events that occurred, it wasn’t because the Rakhines were extreme. The problems were all started by them,” the Muslims, he said.

SCORCHED EARTH

In Theak Kae Pyin camp, a sea of tarpaulin tents and fragile huts built of straw from the last rice harvest, there is an air of growing permanence. More than 11,000 live in this camp alone, according to U.N. data. Naked children bathe in a murky-brown pond and play on sewage-lined pathways.

A year ago, before the unrest, Haleda Somisian lived in Narzi, a Sittwe district of more than 10,000 people. Today, it is rubble and scorched earth. Somisian, 20, wants to return and rebuild. Her husband, she says, has started to beat her. In Narzi, he worked. Now he is jobless, restless and despondent.

“I want to leave this place,” she said.

Some of those confined to the camps are Kaman Muslims, who are recognized as one of Myanmar’s 135 official ethnic groups; they usually hold citizenship and can be hard to tell apart from Rakhine Buddhists. They fled after October’s violence when their homes were destroyed by Rakhine mobs in remote townships such as Kyaukphyu. They, too, are prevented from leaving.

Beyond Sittwe, another 50,000 people, mostly Rohingya, live in similar camps in other parts of the state destroyed in last year’s sectarian violence.

Across the state, the U.N relief agency has provided about 4,000 tents and built about 300 bamboo homes, each of which can hold eight families. Another 500 bamboo homes are planned by year-end. None are designed to be permanent, said agency spokeswoman Vivian Tan. Tents can last six months to a year; bamboo homes about two years.

The agency wants to provide the temporary shelter that is badly needed. “But we don’t want in any way to create permanent shelters and to condone any kind of segregation,” Tan said.

Aid group Doctors Without Borders has accused hardline nationalists of threatening its staff, impairing its ability to deliver care. Mobile clinics have appeared in some camps, but a U.N. report describes most as “insufficient.”

Waadulae, suffering from rabies, was treated at Dar Paing hospital, whose lone worker, Maung Maung Hla, was overwhelmed. “We have run out of antibiotics,” he said. “There is no malaria medicine. There’s no medicine for tuberculosis or diabetes. No vaccines. There’s no equipment to check peoples’ condition. There are no drips for people suffering from acute diarrhea.”

State spokesman Win Myaing said Rakhine doctors feared entering the camps. “It’s reached a stage where they say they’d quit their jobs before they would go to these places,” he said.

The treatment of the Rohingya contrasts with that of some 4,080 displaced ethnic Rakhine Buddhists in central Sittwe. They can leave their camps freely, work in the city, move in with relatives in nearby villages and rebuild, helped by an outpouring of aid from Burmese business leaders.

Hset Hlaing, 33, who survives on handouts from aid agencies at Thae Chaung camp, recalls how he earned 10,000 kyat ($11 a day) from a general-goods stall in Sittwe before his business and home went up in flames last June. Like other Muslims, he refuses to accept the term Bengali.

“I don’t want to go to another country. I was born here,” he says, sipping tea in a bamboo shack. “But if the government won’t accept us, we will leave. We’ll go by boat. We’ll go to a country that can accept us.”

(Edited by Andrew R.C. Marshall and Bill Tarrant.)

Rohingya Education

It is our great pleasure to inform our Rohingya respected elders, seniors, educated, professional, businessmen and all level of brothers and sisters that we, with the blessing of Allah and support of our people, a group of concern Rohingya from different levels of age groups and different professional academic background in Malaysia came to a decision that changes to a internal condition within capacities and capabilities are more paramount as it is demanded by the external factors and actors. Every capable Rohingyas are obliged to take part in the process of changes to the better social conditions in every aspects of our lives. The system of changes into a better social conditions are going to be processed by a National Organization which we named it as “ROHINGYA NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION (RNDO) with the aim and objectives which may not be able to achieve without our Rohingya unified supports and Allah’s blessing:

1. To build a united exemplary strong Rohingya Nation who would be able to contribute to the world affairs.

2. To develop & increase the rate of literacy to make better condition of the lives.

3. To research and develop all the elements of culture of the Rohingya nation.

4. To strongly demand our all Rights as citizen in our homeland.

Note: it is being working in the building foundation stage, we are expected to officially launch by beginning of next year. All concerns Rohingyas, businessmen, seniors, activists and leaders are cordially invited to our launch. We will inform further information in the coming days. drop your comments @ support.us@rndo.org or rndo.malaysia@gmail.com, like us http://www.facebook.com/rndo.malaysia

UN Warns against Violence in Myanmar

UN Warns against Violence in Myanmar
TEHRAN (FNA)- The United Nations warned that violence against Muslims in Myanmar threatens the process of economic and political reforms in the country.

UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar Tomas Ojea Quintana on Thursday warned against the rise of anti-Muslim sentiments in Myanmar, press tv reported.

Quintana added that Myanmar’s government needs to do more “to tackle the spread of discriminatory views and to protect vulnerable minority communities”.

Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar account for about five percent of the country’s population of nearly 60 million. They are persecuted and have faced torture, neglect, and repression since the country’s independence in 1948.

Violence in Western state of Rakhine, one of the most impoverished regions of Myanmar that is home to one million people, mostly Rohingya Muslims, has continued in 2013. About 140,000 people, including Muslims, have been left homeless in Rakhine.

“The situation in Rakhine State has fed a wider anti-Muslim narrative in Myanmar, which is posing one of the most serious threats to the reform process. Rakhine State remains in a situation of profound crisis,” Quintana stated.

On October 6, Myanmar’s state media reported that police had arrested over 40 Buddhists after houses of Muslims came under an arson attack while President Thein Sein was visiting Rakhine.

On October 2, police said that five Muslims had been killed in the village of Thabyuchaing as hundreds of Buddhists went on a rampage.

Human rights organizations blame Myanmar’s government for turning a blind eye to the violence against Muslims in the country.

“The underlying issue of discrimination against Muslim and particularly Rohingya populations remains unaddressed,” Quintana said, adding, “Allegations of gross violations since the violence erupted last June, including by state security personnel, remains unaddressed.”

It is only my comment about Suu Kyi’s interview on BBC. Suu Kyi lying,why?

Suu Kyi lying,why?At least Suu Kyi should respect to herself but her tune proved that the exacerbating tension between Muslims and Buddhist is on the base of religious and nationalism but lying,why?.She is a pious political leader following Buddism and fearing to tell any real guilty against Buddhist although all the muslims community is under the sword of monk, pre-planned to clear completely from the land of Myanmar.
I would like to ask her, What kind of leader you are?What are the charateristics of a leader?Why are you barking on every campign for the tranparency?Did you mean, hiding of the truth is tranparency?
Greediness is dangerous, to become a president is a dream for her but approved by west. It isn’t a positive sign for Myanmar to elect her as a president as she is a west handle with a western family.
My last conclusion is “She will be one of the bittest leader of our country if unfortunately she was elected”.

Thanks

It is only my comment about Suu Kyi’s interview on BBC.I would like to recv more analysis on her ideology from all of muslim world.

I think her greediness to become a president is overwhelmed all the truth that is well known and clear before all over the world but pursuing and waiting to take to the right position of the goverment in the possible time.She should respect to herself, was respected by the rest world.I know politic is a dirty game but telling the truth is bravery and charateristic of an honest leader.

I want to convey her “No every president is respectful but one who respect to himself,a liar wouldn’t be respectable”.

Thanks

Birth rate; crude (per 1;000 people) in Myanmar

The Birth rate; crude (per 1;000 people) in Myanmar was last reported at 17.29 in 2010, according to a World Bank report published in 2012. Crude birth rate indicates the number of live births occurring during the year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. Subtracting the crude death rate from the crude birth rate provides the rate of natural increase, which is equal to the rate of population change in the absence of migration.This page includes a historical data chart, news and forecasts for Birth rate; crude (per 1;000 people) in Myanmar.

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Birth rate (most recent) by country

 

People Statistics > Birth rate (most recent) by country

DEFINITION: The average annual number of births during a year per 1,000 persons in the population at midyear; also known as crude birth rate. The birth rate is usually the dominant factor in determining the rate of population growth. It depends on both the level of fertility and the age structure of the population.
VIEW DATA: Totals
Definition     Source      Printable version
Bar Graph Map


Showing latest available data. Select another time period:

Rank Countries  Amount  Date
# 1   Niger: 50.54 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 2   Uganda: 47.49 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 3   Mali: 45.62 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 4   Zambia: 44.08 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 5   Burkina Faso: 43.59 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 6   Ethiopia: 42.99 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 7   Angola: 42.91 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 8   Somalia: 42.71 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 9   Burundi: 41.01 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 10   Malawi: 40.85 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 11   Congo, Republic of the: 40.55 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 12   Western Sahara: 39.95 births/1,000 population 2008 Time series
# 13   Mozambique: 39.62 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 14   Chad: 39.4 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 15   Sierra Leone: 38.46 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 16   Benin: 38.11 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 17   São Tomé and Príncipe: 38.03 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 18   Afghanistan: 37.83 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 19   Gaza Strip: 37.75 births/1,000 population 2008 Time series
# 20   Congo, Democratic Republic of the: 37.74 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 21   Madagascar: 37.51 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 22   Liberia: 37.25 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 23   Guinea: 36.9 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 24   Rwanda: 36.74 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 25   Senegal: 36.73 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 26   Central African Republic: 36.46 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 27   Sudan: 36.12 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 28   Togo: 35.58 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 29   Nigeria: 35.51 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 30   Equatorial Guinea: 35.43 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 31   Gabon: 35.19 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 32   Guinea-Bissau: 35.15 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 33   Comoros: 34.19 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 33   Gambia, The: 34.19 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 35   Kenya: 33.54 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 36   Yemen: 33.49 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 37   Mauritania: 33.23 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 38   Cameroon: 33.04 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 39   Eritrea: 32.8 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 40   Tanzania: 32.64 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 41   Zimbabwe: 31.86 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 42   Mayotte: 31.67 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 43   Côte d’Ivoire: 30.95 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 44   Marshall Islands: 29.11 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 45   Iraq: 28.81 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 46   Solomon Islands: 28.03 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 47   Nauru: 27.78 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 48   Ghana: 27.55 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 49   Guatemala: 26.96 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 50   Lesotho: 26.93 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 51   Jordan: 26.79 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 52   Swaziland: 26.63 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 53   Papua New Guinea: 26.44 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 54   Belize: 26.43 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 55   Tajikistan: 26.29 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 56   Laos: 26.13 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 57   West Bank: 25.95 births/1,000 population 2008 Time series
# 58   East Timor: 25.7 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 59   Cambodia: 25.4 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 60   Philippines: 25.34 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 61   Djibouti: 25.27 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 61   Tonga: 25.27 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 63   Honduras: 25.14 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 64   Pakistan: 24.81 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 65   Bolivia: 24.71 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 66   Egypt: 24.63 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 67   Haiti: 24.4 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 68   Oman: 24.15 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 69   Libya: 24.04 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 70   Syria: 23.99 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 71   Kyrgyzstan: 23.66 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 72   Tuvalu: 23.24 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 73   Bangladesh: 22.98 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 74   American Samoa: 22.84 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 75   Kiribati: 22.73 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 76   Samoa: 22.5 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 77   Botswana: 22.31 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 78   Micronesia, Federated States of: 22.22 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 79   Nepal: 22.17 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 80   Namibia: 21.48 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 81   Cape Verde: 21.47 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 82   Kuwait: 21.32 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 83   Fiji: 21.11 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 84   Malaysia: 21.08 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 85   India: 20.97 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 86   Mongolia: 20.93 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 87   Vanuatu: 20.86 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 88   Northern Mariana Islands: 20.69 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 89   French Guiana: 20.46 births/1,000 population 2006 Time series
# 90   Venezuela: 20.1 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 91   Ecuador: 19.96 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 92   Dominican Republic: 19.67 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 93   Turkmenistan: 19.54 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 94   South Africa: 19.48 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 95   Nicaragua: 19.46 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 96   Panama: 19.43 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 97   Peru: 19.41 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 98   Saudi Arabia: 19.34 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 99   Burma: 19.31 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 100   Israel: 19.24 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 101   Jamaica: 19.2 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 102   Morocco: 19.19 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 103   Mexico: 19.13 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 103   Bhutan: 19.13 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 105   Réunion: 18.9 births/1,000 population 2006 Time series
# 106   Iran: 18.55 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 107   Indonesia: 18.1 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 108   Turkey: 17.93 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 109   Brunei: 17.87 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 110   Azerbaijan: 17.85 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 110   Guam: 17.85 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 112   Brazil: 17.79 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 113   Turks and Caicos Islands: 17.76 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 114   El Salvador: 17.75 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 115   Argentina: 17.54 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 116   Colombia: 17.49 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 117   Paraguay: 17.48 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 118   Uzbekistan: 17.43 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 119   Sri Lanka: 17.42 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 120   Tunisia: 17.4 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 121   Guyana: 17.12 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 122   Vietnam: 17.07 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 123   Grenada: 17.01 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 124   Algeria: 16.69 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 125   Kazakhstan: 16.65 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 126   Costa Rica: 16.54 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 127   Suriname: 16.42 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 128   Antigua and Barbuda: 16.31 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 129   New Caledonia: 16.28 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 130   Bahamas, The: 16.1 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 130   Ireland: 16.1 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 132   United Arab Emirates: 15.87 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 133   Dominica: 15.62 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 134   French Polynesia: 15.53 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 135   Qatar: 15.48 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 136   Cook Islands: 15.37 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 137   Seychelles: 15.33 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 138   Guadeloupe: 15.05 births/1,000 population 2006 Time series
# 139   Lebanon: 15.02 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 140   Maldives: 14.83 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 141   Bahrain: 14.64 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 142   Saint Lucia: 14.63 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 143   Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: 14.62 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 144   Greenland: 14.6 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 145   Korea, North: 14.51 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 146   British Virgin Islands: 14.5 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 147   Netherlands Antilles: 14.37 births/1,000 population 2008 Time series
# 148   Trinidad and Tobago: 14.35 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 149   Chile: 14.33 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 150   Gibraltar: 14.23 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 151   Saint Kitts and Nevis: 14.07 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 152   Mauritius: 13.97 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 153   Wallis and Futuna: 13.96 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 154   United States: 13.83 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 155   Martinique: 13.74 births/1,000 population 2006 Time series
# 156   New Zealand: 13.68 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 157   Uruguay: 13.52 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 158   Iceland: 13.29 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 159   Faroe Islands: 12.95 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 159   Thailand: 12.95 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 161   Anguilla: 12.92 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 162   Armenia: 12.85 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 163   Aruba: 12.78 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 164   Barbados: 12.35 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 165   Australia: 12.33 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 166   China: 12.29 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 166   United Kingdom: 12.29 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 166   France: 12.29 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 169   Cayman Islands: 12.24 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 170   Albania: 12.15 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 171   Macedonia, Republic of: 11.87 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 172   Luxembourg: 11.69 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 173   Montserrat: 11.67 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 174   Saint Helena: 11.45 births/1,000 population 2008 Time series
= 175   Man, Isle of: 11.42 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 175   Bermuda: 11.42 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 177   Cyprus: 11.41 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 177   Virgin Islands: 11.41 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 179   Puerto Rico: 11.35 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 180   Moldova: 11.16 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 181   Russia: 11.05 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 182   Jersey: 10.9 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 183   Norway: 10.84 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 184   Palau: 10.74 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 185   Georgia: 10.73 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 186   Spain: 10.66 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 187   Slovakia: 10.48 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 188   Estonia: 10.45 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 189   Finland: 10.37 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 190   Malta: 10.35 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 191   Denmark: 10.29 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 192   Canada: 10.28 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 193   Netherlands: 10.23 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 194   Sweden: 10.18 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 195   Guernsey: 10.13 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 196   Belgium: 10.06 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 197   Poland: 10.01 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 198   Cuba: 9.99 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 199   Latvia: 9.96 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 200   Portugal: 9.94 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 201   Belarus: 9.76 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 202   Andorra: 9.66 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 203   Liechtenstein: 9.65 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 204   Ukraine: 9.62 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 205   Croatia: 9.6 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
= 205   Hungary: 9.6 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 207   Romania: 9.55 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 208   Switzerland: 9.53 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 209   Bulgaria: 9.32 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 210   Lithuania: 9.29 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 211   Greece: 9.21 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 212   Serbia and Montenegro: 9.19 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 213   Italy: 9.18 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 214   Macau: 9.03 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 215   San Marino: 9.02 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 216   Taiwan: 8.9 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 217   Bosnia and Herzegovina: 8.89 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 218   Slovenia: 8.85 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 219   Czech Republic: 8.7 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 220   Austria: 8.67 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 221   Korea, South: 8.55 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 222   Singapore: 8.5 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 223   Saint Pierre and Miquelon: 8.32 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 224   Germany: 8.3 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 225   Hong Kong: 7.49 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 226   Japan: 7.31 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
# 227   Monaco: 6.94 births/1,000 population 2011 Time series
Weighted average: 20.2 births/1,000 population
Historical countries, unions or other regions:
European Union 9.83 births/1,000 population